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The Humanity of Post-Acute Care: Part 3

This following blog excerpt originally appeared on the Provider Magazine Long Term & Post-Acute Care website and was written by Vivian Tellis Nayak. Click here to see the original post.

Robert Murray sat at the desk with three octogenarian fellow residents; they had an air of authority. Across the desk, the young, shy, but confident Angelica Riviera took her seat.

At the Bethel Health and Rehabilitation Center, a meeting of the ages was about to begin: knowledge developed over 300 cumulative years, arrayed against the untested idealism of the 19-year-old Angelica. This was the final meeting where this team of seniors would declare whether Angelica measured up to the certified nurse assistant (CNA) job she was seeking.

Elders in skilled nursing centers recruiting their own caregivers is something you would expect Diane Judson, director of nursing, to initiate. She has a cultivated way of relating to residents. She connects with the person concealed within an aging body; she recognizes the human spirit yearning to be whole, to reach its potential, and to rise above selfishness and to serve others.

The four residents who interviewed Angelica are the Recruiting Council Judson installed over a year ago. As recruiters, they take over after the routine preliminaries and paperwork. They have the final say in CNA hiring. Robert Murray, a victim of Lou Gehrig’s disease, is an active member. He led the interview with Angelica. His amplifier headset muffled his labored words, but Angelica sensed the pathos in the question Murray directed toward her.

Murray asked her, “Angelica, you see, I am only 42, but I am not a whole person anymore. ALS has crippled me. I can barely move around. I cannot talk with you without this amplifier headset. I was a full person once. I am not anymore. Angelica, as my caregiver, what can you do to make me feel whole again?”

See Angelica’s response and read the rest of this article here.

Tellis-Nayak, PhD, is senior research advisor at NRC Health, Lincoln, Neb. He has been a university professor, whose scholarly work has been published in national and international professional journals. He and his wife, Mary Tellis-Nayak, have co-authored a book, “Return of Compassion to Healthcare,” which upholds humanity as the ultimate measure of success. He can be contacted at vtellisn@gmail.com.